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9 Must-Have Items in Pro Taran Butlers Range Bag

9 Must-Have Items in Pro Taran Butlers Range Bag/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d4ba69d0_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d4ba69d0_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Team Benelli 3-gun pro Taran Butler. Taran Butler has made a name for himself as a top shot on the 3-Gun circuit, a member of Team Benelli and an instructor for Hollywood actors. Below is an excerpt from an interview Butler did with Barb Baird of Women's Outdoor News . The big question Baird had for someone who lives in his range bag, what exactly is in it? Related GunDigest Articles Leapers Introduces Conveniently Sized Pistol Range Bag 8 Pieces Of Shooting Gear To Build A Top Range Bag Gun Range: Where to Shoot Trainer of the stars and dubbed one of the most versatile competitive shooters in the world, Hollywood’s Taran Butler is a no-nonsense, get-it-done-now guy. You might know him as one of Benelli’s 3-Gun pros, and he has collected multiple championships, including the Rocky Mountain World 3-Gun tactical champion (three times) and SMM 3-Gun Tactical Champion, 11 times consecutively. During the height of his current competitive season, Butler took time to reveal what he carries in his trusty range bag, made by Green Mountain. “I have been using the Green Mountain bag since 1996, and it’s awesome—not overly big or too small, and it can handle brutal baggage handlers. It’s by far the ultimate bag,” said Butler. For 3-Gun matches, Butler shoots a custom TR-1 ULTIMATE AR-15, TTI Glock 34, TTI ulti-mate Benelli M2 and a custom Infinity 1911. Here’s what you’ll find in his range bag: Infinity 1911 24-round magazines BLADE TECH holster belt and mag pouches Federal and Black Hills ammo Tools and replacement parts Pro Grip spray Oakley glasses, Vltor fitted hat 4-shot shotgun Kaddys Aquafina water, vitamins PMags Editor's note, the NRAblog.com was the source for this story.

Gun Owners : Dont be Part of the Problem

Gun Owners : Dont be Part of the Problem

There are many subcultures in the firearms community. You have three gunners, hunters, cowboy action shooters, 1911 fanatics, and weekend plinkers to name a few. Chances are that we are all a cross over of several types of the shooting categories I listed. The common bond with all these groups is our shared love and respect of the firearms and the shooting sports as a whole. I would like to believe that despite our gun preferences and different backgrounds that we all as the firearms community and movement could work toward advancing the pro gun causes of the collective firearms community. The problem if I can call it that with the collective positivity is that there is a small segment of our gun community that seems hell bent on stopping the growth the the hobby by their actions. This is the small segment of our culture that I am addressing when I say Gun Owners, Don’t be part of the problem. We all know the type of personality I’m talking about, we collectively refer to him as “That Guy”. We Have all seen “That Guy” hell I’m willing to bet that some of us have been “That Guy”. Sometimes we have behaved in a manner consistent with douchebag behavior by our own choice, other times its without any real conscious thoughts, we just react and poof, were are acting like douchebags before we know it. It happens from time to time at the range or the office or even in the firearms industry itself. A person can come across as so aggressive or egotistical that they speak or act in a manner that honestly paints all gun owners in a negative light. There are literally dozens of these types on YouTube and millions of followers. This type of behavior is one that almost everyone I personally know in the firearms community works tirelessly to overcome. Beware “That Guy” is Everywhere We don’t have to go very far to see the negative effects of these types of people in the firearms industry and community. I’m sure we all have the same type of stories about the guy or gal at the local gun shop or big box store that we all cringe when we see him helping new shooters. That’s what seems to be the universal constant with these types of people they exhibit a lot of the same personality traits and tendencies. For fun we decided to list a few of them, the list could be a mile long but we kept it short. Attributes of “That Guy” Loud & Abrasive Has “Been there, done that” mentality Refuses to be open to ideas or contrary opinions If he doesn’t own “It” than its garbage Always seems to have some sort of Special Operations Sniper Friend who trained him Likes the phrase ” I wish someone would ….” The personality that I’ve described unfortunately isn’t unique to just the shooting range, your local office or the small gun shops, it also is in place in the larger firearms industry as well. As a professional writer I have been to SHOT Show in Las Vegas twice now and I can tell you that it exists to a smaller extent in the larger world of firearms manufacturing and importing. In my three plus years of writing and covering the industry I have seen first hand the backroom dealings and shady antics of people in the industry. The firearms world maybe large in terms of dollars but it’s relatively small in terms of knowing people. Employees move from company to company in this industry and networking is a huge key to many introductions and deals. A good reputation will open many doors, and a bad one will leave you with a stack of business cards and no return calls. There is a way to be a professional, and most people I have dealt with in the industry know that and act accordingly. All is Not Lost…How to Fight Back Against “That Guy” Mentality I’m not trying to paint a bad view of the firearms industry, but it is like every other type of business, there are good guys and not so good guys. The people I have met and worked with professionally are some of the nicest, most generous and professional people I have ever met in business. That is because they work hard to counteract the effects of the “That Guy” personalities that are out there. The bottom line when it all boils down is that they recognize a problem, and make conscious efforts to correct it in their business life and model. We can do the same thing in our personal lives either at the office, the range, or in our own sphere of influence. In closing I will tell you something a U.S. Army Green Beret once told me about team building “Being successful is about recognizing everyone brings something to the table and using what they brought”. This simple phrase has stuck with me as I have tried to apply it to the gun world. We need the new gun owners, We have new people coming into our sport all the time, and they bring an enthusiasm and eagerness to learn and tell all their friends how much fun it is to shoot and own guns. We need this growth to sustain the industry and spur gun sales. Growth in the amount of legal gun sales will help us in the long run as a hobby and an industry. We also need the older shooters who are willing to teach, train and the new generation. I love the firearms community as much as the next guy, hell I chose to be involved with it as a second career, squeezing it between college, a personal life and a 40 hour a week day job. BUT, We have to be better as a community about policing ourselves. I’m not talking about making a governmental organization to control ourselves, we already have that in the BATFE with all its regulations. I’m talking about taking simple small deliberate steps to stamp out the effects of “That Guy” mentality. Be willing to check your ego and talk to the new gun owner and listen to their points of view, be willing to call a call someone out when you see something that is detrimental to the gun industry. I’m not saying start a fight, I’m saying to act with a measure of common sense and handle the situation, Verbally. Get involved with Project Appleseed , the NRA Instructors Program or some other program, but just Do SOMETHING. Get in the game and show people that the “That Guy” personality is a small minority of the firearms community on a personal and professional level.

My AR-15 RECCE Build [Aero Precision Base]

My AR-15 RECCE Build [Aero Precision Base]

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s If you are reading this, there is a good chance you have been afflicted with the constant need to build another AR. It may have started off innocent enough, but now you are eating Ramen noodles, selling blood plasma, or like me, writing part-time to get your next fix. Aero RECCE Complete I am an enabler . I recommend leaning into it. Don’t fight it. You won’t win. The good news is that I can help with some suggestions, and that is what this article will be about. Sorry If you are thinking about building your next jack of all trades RECCE Rifle, keep reading! I will go over my choices for my build and what I recommend! Table of Contents Loading... Best Rifle in Its Class The RECCE Rifle, pronounced “RECKY”, is one of the best working rifles for several situations. Typically barrel length is 16”, but some people prefer an 18”. More people are using 13.7-14.5” barrels as well, but the 16” with a mid-length gas system typically gives the best compromise between velocity, maneuverability, and felt recoil. Author’s home-rolled RECCE build. Optics usually consist of a 1-6X low-powered variable optic (LPVO). You can go higher, or lower to a 1-4X depending on how far you plan to shoot targets. A solid LPVO can make a RECCE Rifle shine with true 1X magnification which makes getting on target fast. AR-15 Builder’s reaction to a new build (us included) The best part about the RECCE Rifle is that you can make it your own. That is precisely why they are fun to build. For more information on the RECCE Rifle, and quality built rifles, check out our Best RECCE Rifles . My Barrel FN USA makes great barrels. I went with FN’s 16” CHF, Chrome-Lined, Mid-Length gassed barrel. This barrel is amazing quality. It is also more than accurate for a chrome-lined barrel. FN AR-15 CHF Chrome-Lined Barrels 300 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 300 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing The chrome-lining is double the thickness of typical government contract M4 carbine barrels and are the M249 SAW spec for lining. For a semi-automatic AR15, this barrel will last and deal with heat very well. The MIL-B – 11595E steel used is the same material used for their machine gun barrels. I opted to pin my gas block myself for utmost reliability. Typical accuracy with IMI 77 grain OTM loads at 100 yards. They are expensive compared to other brands, but you do honestly get what you pay for. Accuracy is typically .75 MOA to 1.5 MOA depending on what loads I put down the pipe, but with its 1:7 twist rate, it is fond of Mk262 loads, and other 77 grain OTM loads from IMI, or Magtech. My Bolt My bolt carrier group (BCG) is a model sold by Brownells . For its price, it is one of the better BCGs on the market right now. They offer a budget-minded model, and a harder-use model which is the model I own. Brownells M16 5.56 Bolt Carrier Group 90 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 90 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing My BCG is phosphated and chrome-lined internally in the carrier. The bolt is 158 Carpenter steel, but above all else, it is INDIVIDUALLY high-pressure tested (HPT), and magnetic particle inspected (MPI). Most other companies only BATCH test their bolts which is why they are less expensive. If you want to dive down what exactly that means, take a look at the Best "Bolt Carrier Group" s article we have! Great quality, and the staking is overkill! After the HPT and MPI, the bolt is heat-treated and shot-peened. The gas key is properly staked and uses Grade 8 hardware per Colt TDP. This BCG rocks and on occasion can be found for under $100 on sale. Keep an eye out and check the Daily Deals so you don’t miss sales. The Receivers Both upper and lower receivers are Aero Precision. They are the older, typical forged receivers made of T6 7075 aluminum. For the price, Aero Precision is one of my favorite companies to use for receivers due to the quality and affordable pricing. Editor's Pick (Forged) Aero Precision Lower 60 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 60 at Brownells Compare prices (2 found) Brownells (See Price) Aero Precision (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing The fit between both the upper and the lower is good with little to no wobble. The tensioning screw wasn’t needed even though it came with one. The lower parts kit that I used is a complete CMMG kit, and is one of my favorite kits for the price. Author’s favorite receivers from Aero Precision One of the best features with the CMMG kit is the standard mil-spec trigger that comes with. The trigger uses standard springs, and by no means is it match grade. But the trigger is smooth, with no grit, and the reset is fantastic. I have used this trigger in multiple builds, and I can shoot sub-MOA with it, if the load and barrel can make it happen. CMMG AR-15 Lower Parts Kit 68 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 68 at Brownells Compare prices (3 found) Brownells (See Price) Palmetto State Armory (See Price) Cabelas (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing The Handguard The handguard that I chose is the Daniel Defense MFR XS in a 15” with MLOK. It has everything that you might expect from a handguard with its price range. It is very solid, robust, but also relatively lightweight. The MLOK pattern is at 3, 6, and 9 o’clock around the entire handguard. Daniel Defense MFR XS Handguard 250 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 250 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing Installation is one of the easier designs, and it doesn’t require timing the barrel nut for the gas tube. The locking mechanism is robust, and similar in design to the RIS system from previous designs. Attached to the handguard is a Magpul MLOK hand-stop, which is comfortable for thumb-over-bore shooting. While there are various foregrips out there, the Magpul hand-stop is one of the author’s favorite The iron sights mounted are the basic Magpul polymer iron sights and at some point, will be upgraded to a more robust design. At their price point, the basic Magpul iron sights are great, especially if they are last resort back-up irons. Luckily, the rear sight while folded will clear underneath my optic. Magpul MBUS 67 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 67 at Amazon Compare prices (2 found) Amazon (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing The Stock The stock that I chose for this RECCE build was the Magpul UBR Gen2 . This stock is built like a rock and is about as heavy as one. Luckily, it does well in balancing my rifle out. I can not overstate how absolutely rock solid this design is. Magpul UBR Buttstock 166 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 166 at Brownells Compare prices (3 found) Brownells (See Price) Optics Planet (See Price) Cabela's (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing I wanted something solid like an A2 rifle stock, but I also wanted adjustability if the need arose. That is why I made the decision to go with the UBR. Once adjusted, there is ZERO wobble. The stock locks into place and is practically bomb-proof. If you can find a heavier duty, more solid stock, please let me know. The buffer and spring are from VLTOR. It is their A5 system that uses an H2 weighted buffer. The spring is a standard rifle spring. Along with a good muzzle brake, this system is superior to a typical carbine weighted and sized buffer and recoil spring. It really tames felt recoil, and keeps the weapon shooting flat. The Optic A RECCE Rifle is only as good as the optic that runs on it. I am a huge proponent of using an LPVO on a RECCE Rifle, and preferably of a rugged design that will last. I chose the Trijicon 1-4x Accupower . It is a very solid middle of the road optic. Trijicon AccuPower 1-4x24 APW Green MIL-Square Crosshair Scope 614 at EuroOptic Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 614 at EuroOptic Prices accurate at time of writing Its illumination is not as bright as a Vortex Razor 1-6x, but the reticle is a smart design. The circle dot reticle works well at close range or pushing out to moderate ranges of 400-500 yards. Above all, the scope is rugged and can take a beating. This optic has yet to give me a hiccup. The Trijicon 1-4x Accupower in a 30mm BOBRO QD mount An optic is only as good as the mount it resides in though. That is why I use my Trijicon in a BOBRO QD mount. It is one of the more solid QD mounts, and quick-disconnect may or may not be important to you. It is for me and that is the only way to quickly get to back-up irons if an optic should die. Parting Shots RECCE Rifles can be done up in any sort of way. The great thing about them is that they are not like the Mk18 or Mk12. It’s not a clone, and you can go ham on whatever parts you like. It is a versatile ideology of a rifle, and it’s hard to go wrong! Have you built a RECCE Rifle? What parts did you use? What is your rifle’s main purpose?If you’re looking to upgrade your optics, take a look at the Best AR-15 Scopes & Optics ! The Tested Best 1-6x Scopes

Personal Protection Tactics for Kids (Something all Parents should Consider)

Personal Protection Tactics for Kids (Something all Parents should Consider)

Almost every day we read about a child being abducted, beat up by someone, or abused. It is terrible when these bad things happen to children. Now, kids will get into fights, and all kids will tussle with each other that is normal and integral part of childhood. But when the time comes that a child must protect themselves from a real bad person, they should know what to do. Most parents teach their kids some aspects of personal protection, such don’t talk to strangers, never get into a strangers car, or don’t accept anything from a stranger. And those are good superficial tools to know and use. However not all bad encounters are with someone they do not know, and you do not want your child to grow up learning not to be friendly. Quick Navigation What Can You Do? Step 1. Where Are The Exits? Call 5-0 Crawl, Walk, Shoot What Can You Do? So what can you do as a parent to teach your child personal protection skills without making them scared of everything and everyone? This is a real concern and a balance must be maintained not scare your child, but to build confidence that they know they can protect themselves if needed. General Mattis once said “Be polite, Be professional, but have a plan to kill everyone you meet”. Now that is overboard for kids, but the notion is a good one. Always be polite, Always be courteous, Always be engaging, but be ready to protect yourself if needed. Even in situations that don’t appear dangerous and even with people that you do not suspect are criminals. We all know that the best means to survive a bad situation is to be as prepared as possible. Thus, it is never too early to begin the process of teaching your kids the fundamental skills of personal protection. The essential basic skills of personal protection are: Utilizing situational awareness, knowing good hand to hand or self defensive techniques, having a personal protection toll available and knowing when and how to use it, and finally having emergency response plans for selected scenarios. Also Read: Winter SHTF – Keeping Your Family Alive Naturally, small children are not going to be able to comprehend the reason you are teaching them these skills and will not be able to understand all the tactics. So they must learn by example, from you. So this part of the process means including your child your everyday personal protection procedures. As you have hopefully learned , Situational Awareness is the number one skill you must have in order to know your surroundings, make threat assessments and determine actions. So the first step in teaching your child personal protection skills are to teach them Situational Awareness. How do you do that… Well… let’s look at some examples. First, if you as parent do not have any training in Situational Awareness then this can be a family event that will be good for everyone. Step 1. You first start with actions that take place inside the house. Simple daily things such as opening the door should be used as a teaching experience. Anytime someone knocks at your door you should never just walk to the door and open it. Even if you know who it is… This is a perfect situation to be a teaching experience. You should always notify your child someone is at the door… then tell them they should never open the door without seeing who it is, followed by taking them to any point in the house where they can see the person at the front door. Once they see the person outside, identify the person to them, prior to moving to open the door. During this time you remind them that if they do not know the person then they should not open the door and they are to come and get mommy or daddy. And finally, practice and practice these skills by every time you are out discussing with your child what is going on around them. Such as, Wow did you see that really cool car? Did you notice that family walking their dog? Lead me to our car using the safest route. These are just a couple very simple examples of things you can do with your child to encourage them to pay attention around them. It may save their life. Another way to teach your child Situational Awareness, is anytime you are about to exit your car, you and your child take a look around to see if everything is ok to get out. Same when exiting a store, prior to walking straight to your car, you should stop just outside the store then you and your child survey the parking lot to look for potential threats. Naturally, you do not present it to them as looking for “threat” it is much better to present it to them as “making sure everything is safe”. Where Are The Exits? Another practice teaching moment should be when out eating dinner… you can ask your child to point to all the exits, and briefly discuss which one the easiest to get to if something should happen and the need to get out. So teaching them this basic skill is a great start to them learning personal protection tactics. This can be done at a very early age, kids as young as 2 like playing games and this can be taught as a form of game. This next evolution is going to be much harder. It is imperative in my opinion that parents work to teach their kids the dangers of texting and talking on their phones when they should be playing attention to their surroundings. The hardest part of teaching your kids about this danger is to live by the same rule yourself. So in essence this is good training for the whole family. I feel strongly it is two of the worst things you can be doing in a public place is talking or texting on your phone. As a test in many locations I have seen how close I might be able to get to a person before they know I have gotten within a yard or so of them. Most were on their phones, some had ear buds in and others were just in oblivious to the world, all were in extreme Condition White. Condition White, basically, is when you are oblivious to your surroundings. In ALL cases I was within a danger zone of being close to them and NONE of them knew it. And you wonder how people become victims in the most open and populated spaces and never saw it coming. Easy — they were not paying attention at ALL. So in order to teach your kids the dangerous hazards of being oblivious to the world around them, I encourage three training tools. First, stop it yourself; teach by example and practice your Situational Awareness skills. Again, not to make your child feel scared, that would be wrong, but to show your child the confidence that comes from always taking the basic steps to enhance safety. Secondly, I would share with them videos on YouTube that illustrate people getting in trouble by being on their phone. Call 5-0 All children should be taught that it is very acceptable to call the police if they feel in danger or see anything where a person needs help or they think a crime may be occurring or was committed. All children should be assured that calling the police is not a bad thing, but they must also be instructed that it is for real danger situations. If they feel the police are not needed but they are very concerned or suspicious, every child should know that it is fully acceptable and encouraged for them to call their parents. Now again, I do not want to neither scare kids, nor make them feel they must call about everything, but with the right instruction, they should know when and when not to call the police or their parents, but also when too. Self defense skills are the next step in this process. And again they can be taught at a very young age, kids as young as 4 and 5 are taking and actively participating in self defense classes. There are a number of self defense martial arts and most are very good. However, I am partial to Krav Maga and I think it is the best for personal protection self defense. Related: Family Survival Martial Arts training is far more than just self defense training for children and it is well worth the investment. Martial Arts programs teach discipline, self control, confidence, respect and many other very valuable life skills. So choosing any one of them will be of value. As I said, I favor Krav Maga because not only is it an outstanding self defense skill but is a physical training program that is an excellent form of exercise. But it is truly taught with the idea that you are learning this skill to protect yourself. It is not so much as about breaking boards, stances, rituals it is all about how do you in and bad situation protect yourself to the best of your ability. Krav Maga is a more of a combative self defense training program that teaches you that if you are attacked, then you should go on the offensive quickly in order to subdue the attacker. Thus, this is known as get ugly early. The value of this type of training is that it gives kids a sense of confidence that if they are in a bad situation they have training to hopefully get out of it. In particular, when it comes to fighting off an attacker where quick action and implementation is the key to survival. I have learned there is a wide range of instructors in this discipline. As with any instructional course, there may be different styles of teaching and variations of programs offered. Thus, like any other course you are taking you should research the instructor and observe there training programs before joining and signing your child up as a student. Next, I think all children should learn about firearms. Not that you expect them at a young age to use one for personal protection, but it is the first step in the process. Just like you teach your child the benefits and dangers of other hazardous items in your house, such as knives, the stove, hammers, and cutting tools, you need to take the same time to instruct your child about firearms. If you are not comfortable with doing that then there are many NRA courses for kids and in most states the Fish and Wildlife Game Department will offer Hunter Safety courses. These are all good starting points if you do not feel comfortable. I know numerous kids at the young age of 7 and 8 some younger, that know about firearms and have even been hunting and harvested game. Learning about firearms is a life lesson. As you never know when you child will be exposed to them without your knowledge and you want them to be trained on what to do in those cases. Crawl, Walk, Shoot As I have mentioned before, I work at a big box sporting goods store. The other day a customer came in a wanted to buy a .22 caliber rifle for this child. When ask how old his child was, he stated his daughter was 3. As the discussion continued, we learned that his daughter had already shot a .410 and he wanted to start training her with a rifle. He then pulled out his phone and should us a video of him helping, but his daughter holding and looking down the barrel of a vintage .410 and shooting it. She was so excited when she shot it. He said his dad was a police officer and started teaching him at a very young age about firearms and shooting and he was now doing the same with his daughter. On the other hand, there are numerous cases where children have used a firearm to protect themselves and others. Naturally, this is not the norm, but it does and has happened. But most importantly, teaching children at a young age about firearms I feel decreases the likelihood of accidents and sets the stage for them to be more comfortable with them as they get older. The final step in teaching children about personal protection and self defense tactics is to have emergency plans. Every family should have at least these four plans and everyone should know them well. First, a fire plan, what do to if the house catches on fire. Secondly, a home invasion plan, this plan would also include what to do if you arrived home and someone is in the house. Thirdly, a bad weather plan, what should everyone do should there be a weather emergency. Can’t Get Home Plan, everyone should know that getting home is not always the best choice, finding a safe haven may be much better. Each of these plans should be well drawn out and practiced. No plan is a plan if it is not designed and practiced. Also Read: Summer Prep for Kids Here are some details that should be included in each plan. Fire Plan, how to sound an alarm, verify all exits are clear, have drop down window ladders for upstairs, have a designated meeting spot once outside. Home invasion plan, develop safe rooms, make sure all inner doors lock, make sure everyone knows where and how to hunker down, and never enter the house if you suspect someone you do not know is in there. Bad Weather Plan, have a delegated weather proof safe room, understand it is not always important to get home, develop safe havens (places you can go when you cannot get home). Pack and place Get Home Bags in every vehicle make sure you have keys to save havens and the folks there know you may be there when a bad event occurs. I understand it sounds like a misnomer to call a bag a Get Home Bag that is intended for use when you can’t get home. To clarify it is a bag designed and filled with items you most likely will need until you do Get Home. Overall, it is equally important to train you child as train yourself. Personal protection is as much a family effort and an individual one. Everyone participating and practice will improve your chances of surviving a bad event. So wait no longer and set the process in place for training your kids. Final Note: Again thanks to Kurt M for his editorial review that only makes these articles better. Other interesting articles: Family Survival: Let’s not forget the kids LifeStraw Personal Water Filter Review: Is This A Good Survival Filter in 2020? Pellet Guns, Not Just For Kids Anymore Survival Prepping in Africa vs USA: Personal Experiences

7 Best AR-15 Foregrips [Hands-On]: Vertical & Angled

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s The AR-15 market in the United States is saturated with just about every kind of accessory you might even think you’d need…everything from lights, bayonets, to even chainsaws. The AR-15 Chainsaw Bayonet – for all your Zombie slaying needs! Narrowing it down to just foregrips, we’re going to tackle that very subject… Best AR-15 Foregrips And tell you about some great ones that are on the market, how to use them, and what they can do for you. Table of Contents Loading... What is an AR-15 Foregrip? It can actually describe a pretty broad category of devices you add to the handguard in order to offer a different kind of grip.  When holding an AR-15, shooters typically hold the handguard under the bottom with their support hand in a cupping grip. However, over the years different objects have been added to these handguards to change the way the support hand merges with the gun.  This is often based on the personal preferences of the shooter. What Does It Do? The general idea of the foregrip is to help you with recoil control.  The AR platform chambered in .223 or 5.56 is not an untamable beast when you pull the trigger. That being said, rapid fire or full-auto variants can make it more difficult to control shot placement.  The concept of the foregrip is a handle, offering more resistance to recoil impulse than a round handguard, which allows you to snug the rifle harder into your shoulder. You can also push foregrips into barricades to stabilize shooting positions. In this article, I’m going to cover a few foregrip sub-categories: vertical, horizontal, and special. Vertical foregrips are pretty common and they are essentially a bar mounted to the bottom of the handguard of an AR.  Referred to as the “broomstick” in the military, the vertical foregrip has come in a few different variations and they offer some distinct advantages. AR-15 Slidefire, Lisa Jean Horizontal is a category that means the grip typically runs more along the bottom of the handguard, but it still manages to give you more of a grip to pull the rifle into your shoulder. Special grips are exactly that.  They may base from one of the above categories but are different enough to warrant a special section of their own. Vertical Grips 1. Daniel Defense Vertical Grip This vertical grip is an excellent choice.  Made of polymer, it comes in different colors and will work with Keymod or M-LOK so you can pick the one that works best for your rifle. A prime example of the vertical foregrip, it is shaped to fit the hand with rounded edges and flat sides. It’s 3.25 inches tall and 2 inches wide, so it fits most hands.  Shooters with larger mitts will feel like their hand is hanging off a bit but they will still have good purchase. Daniel "Defense Vertical Grip" This grip points straight down and allows the shooter to grab it and pull the rifle into the shoulder more firmly.  In the next photo you can see a variant of the traditional broomstick grip, more of a ¾ grip where the bottom of the handguard is still used, but the grip provides resistance to the rear. Daniel Defense Vertical Grip Shooters using this grip will notice a difference in controlling the recoil impulse.  A sight picture is typically not that tough to reacquire when using the grip to pull the buttstock into your shoulder. Gold Standard in VFG Daniel Defense VFG 28 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 28 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing In addition, it changes the ergonomics of the support arm causing a bit less strain on the wrist than a traditional cupping grip on the handguard. 2. Magpul M-LOK MVG The Magpul version of the vertical grip is very similar to the Daniel Defense, though a bit more rounded. It too is made of polymer, comes in a variety of colors and can mount right up to your rail. In the photo above, the grip is mounted to the end of the rail because the rail is shorter on the LWRC rifle being used.  Where you mount the grip can dictate how you hold it. In this case, you are limited to a full fist grip (below). This can be changed with the amount of real estate you have on your handguard. Magpul VFG The MVG is similar in almost all ways to the Daniel Defense grip though I noticed the M-LOK hardware was a bit beefier and the price is much less. Shooters using this old broomstick style hold have to be careful that they are pulling directly back into the shoulder, otherwise shot placement can suffer. Magpul VFG I enjoy shooting with a vertical foregrip, though I do not use the traditional broomstick shooting style. Magpul VFG 18 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 18 at Brownells Compare prices (3 found) Brownells (See Price) Palmetto State Armory (See Price) Rainier Arms (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Both of these grips are great choices for long shooting days (training) if you don’t have a sling as they held you distribute the weight of the rifle while you are in low ready, or just resting the weapon muzzle down. Horizontal or Angled Grips Another variety of the foregrip is horizontal or angled grips.  Serving the same purpose, these grips are a bit more stretched out but still offer the same advantages of the vertical grips in different ways. 3. Magpul Angled Fore Grip (AFG) The AFG is another great polymer option from Magpul that answers the same riddle with a different approach.  Shooters will note the same traditional grip on the bottom of the handguard, though it angles the hand down a bit. This subtle change makes the wrist bend slightly less, creating a more ergonomic placement. Magpul AFG Shooters who prefer thumb-over-bore will find the AFG is a great addition.  Some other benefits are that it cups the hand and gives you reference points.  You can also pull back and develop some good shoulder pressure with the rear bumper—improving recoil recovery for follow-up shots Magpul AFG The front bumper can be jammed into barricades as a stabilization point for that type of shooting as well.  This grip is a great value and comes in different styles with as many as five different colors. Magpul AFG 25 at "Palmetto State Armory" Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 25 at Palmetto State Armory Compare prices (3 found) Palmetto State Armory (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Rainier Arms (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing What’s your take on the AFG? Readers' Ratings 4.96/5 (526) Your Rating? 4. Strike Industries LINK Curved Foregrip The SI Curved Foregrip is a great choice for those who like a more traditional grip position for the support hand.  The bumpers cup the hand really well and allow the gun to be driven forward as well as pulled back into the shoulder. The inside of the foregrip is serrated and allows for great retention. Strike Industries LINK Curved Foregrip Strike Industries is known for some cool innovations and this foregrip does not disappoint.  It comes with the LINK system which allows it to be mounted to either M-LOK or Keymod. Made out of coated aluminum, the Link is tough and very lightweight. Strike Industries LINK Curved Foregrip Best Angled Foregrip Strike Industries LINK 38 at Rainier Arms Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 38 at Rainier Arms Compare prices (2 found) Rainier Arms (See Price) Palmetto State Armory (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Special Grips At least a couple of products currently on the market defy specific categorization because of their approach to accomplishing the same mission of the foregrip. 5. Ryker Grip The Ryker Grip represents a complete departure from the traditional methodology.  The developers at Ryker studied the body mechanics of shooting and moving a rifle.  They then created a product that has a lot of shooters scratching their head—until they try it. Ryker Grip The guys at Ryker have some interesting military backgrounds and they have done some testing with active duty military who have given them feedback. Also, the National Tactical Officers Association (NTOA) recently gave the thumbs up to the Ryker Grip so even though it looks totally different, some serious shooters have given it the nod. Ryker Grip The basic concept is that it serves as an ergonomic grip which mounts on the side of the rifle.  This places the thumb up, and palm in, toward the rifle. Having used this unorthodox grip, I can tell you it removes a lot of the binding that happens in the wrist and forearm. Shooters can drive the gun with surprisingly better accuracy and speed. Ryker Grip The Ryker is made of polymer and is tough.  It currently must mount on a side Picatinny rail, sadly that limits what handguards can use it.  It is reversible so lefties need not despair. 6. Mid-Evil Industries 360 VFG The 360 VFG (vertical foregrip) is a great evolution of the traditional broomstick.  The unit mounts to your rail like a standard grip, but that’s where the similarities end.  With a twist of the bottom portion of the shaft, the upper portion loosens and can rotate. Mid-Evil Industries 360 VFG You can curve the 360 VFG back, forward, and even out to the side.  You can hit just about any angle as it rotates on a ball pivot at the base.  Once you have it in the position you like, simply tighten the end and it locks into place. Mid-Evil Industries 360 VFG The whole unit is made of aluminum, weighs 5.2 ounces and measures 3 7/8 inches long.  The end of the grip can unscrew exposing the hollow handle for battery storage. It comes in four colors and is available for Picatinny, Keymod, and M-LOK! MID-EVIL INDUSTRIES 360 100 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 100 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing 7. Bravo Company KAG Developed by BCM in conjunction with Travis Haley (Haley Strategic Partners), the Kinesthetic Angled Grip is a minimalist approach that brings maximum results.  The KAG reminds me of a comma and it is every bit as useful. This small grip has a foot firmly planted in the horizontal and vertical foregrip worlds.  Mounted on the bottom of your handguard, the KAG serves as a great reference point for the back of your hand. Bravo Company KAG It is so small, you hardly notice its presence but it is extremely comfortable.  It cups the back of your hand and also angles it down slightly, releasing some of the binding that happens in the joints when you raise a file. Bravo Company KAG (2) Despite its small size, it holds enough of your hand to allow you good backpressure, pulling the rifle snugly into your shoulder. With the KAG you can shoot a traditional support grip (albeit more ergonomic) or a thumb-over-bore.  The KAG comes any color you want, as long as that color is black. Best Barricade Stop Bravo Company KAG 18 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 18 at Brownells Compare prices (2 found) Brownells (See Price) Rainier Arms (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Parting Shots There are so many great options out there when it comes to mounting a foregrip to your handguard.  Keep in mind, most of these evolved from the military—people who carry their rifles for hours on end, people who patrol with them, people who shoot their rifles until they need a new barrel. There is no beard-oil, tacticool in these products. They are made with a purpose. Ultimately, you have to decide which will work best for you and the only way to truly know that is to try them.  I have used all the above products and find them to be excellent. Depending on your use of your rifle, you may find one that is a great fit for you too. Regardless, if you get one and like it, you need to train with it! Once you have a foregrip – you’ll want to grab some other upgrades for your rifle! 5 Best AR-15 Flashlights Best AR-15 Handguards Best AR-15 Upgrades So…what is your favorite foregrip? Tell us about it in the comments!

How to Vanish: Part 2

Remember that camouflage does not make you invisible, especially when you are moving.  A human face is a dead giveaway to the trained eye against a heavily forested background.  Breaking up the pattern and removing the natural shine of human skin is a fundamental component of camouflage. This article is part 2 of a series of posts ( read part 1 of How to Vanish ) Although it may go without saying, I’ll mention it anyway.  If you plan to use a face cover then it probably isn’t necessary to use face paint.  However it might be a good idea to use a small amount on any exposed areas such as around the nose and eyes. Providing it is the correct application, some camouflage is better than none, or worse yet, the wrong camouflage.  There are a wide variety of face paints on the market today and that is a good or bad thing.  When I was in the military we had the face paint sticks that looked like overgrown crayons, worse yet they were a pain to use and even worse to remove. If you select a compact that gives you a variety of colors, keep in mind that you should use only the appropriate colors and don’t use every color in the palate. Unless of course you are going to a party and your goal is to look like a clown. Too many people try using the tiger stripe approach much like you see in the movie “ Commando ” with the former Governor of California Arnold Schwarzenegger.  While this may look cool and flashy, it defeats the whole purpose of camouflage in a real life situation.  Also, if you are wearing gloves there is little need to camouflage your hands.  Use your own judgment here. Again, some is better than none.  However it may make putting on and taking off your gloves a little difficult.  For now lets just cover the basics and try to keep it simple.   I use a compact with three colors in it: BLACK, BROWN & GREEN The compact also has a mirror which is a good tool IF you need to use it for signaling or looking around objects such as trees, walls, corners, etc, etc…  If your compact has WHITE in it and your background doesn’t call for that particular color, DON”T use it. Quick Navigation How to Camo Your Face How to "Camo Your Face" STEP 1: Starting with the areas around the eyes, under the nose, on the temples and under the lower lip I would use a light brown or tan.  This will draw attention away from some of the lighter areas on your body (ex: your eyes) and also help to break up the pattern of the human face.  This first step is where a lot of people go wrong by not making the area around their eyes large enough.  If the area is too small then it will draw more attention and look like two circles of the same color (eyes). STEP 2: Next, in the areas between the sides of the nose and the cheek, on each side of the chin near or starting at or near the corners of the mouth and in the center of the forehead, I recommend a medium green or olive drab.  These areas are important to break up your face pattern and are also areas of high shine due to sweat and facial oils. STEP 3: In the areas over the eyes, the cheeks and on the chin I use black.  Remember, nothing in nature is black so don’t over do it. Finally, using my fingertips I blend all of the edges together and over the ears and down onto the neck trying to get a feathered subtle blend from one color to the next, much like you would were it airbrushed on.  The purpose for this approach, as with any camouflage, is to break up the natural outline of your face, body, gear, vehicle, etc, etc… When you are applying camouflage to the hands, this same approach should be used, insuring that the lighter colors are used in the recessed areas, a slightly darker color applied to the “middle ground” areas and the darkest colors over the highest areas.  Also keep in mind that if you are wearing glasses, goggles or a face shield you run the risk of giving off a “glare”. In the near future we will cover camouflage for your gear, vehicle, base camp and more.  I hope this information has proved to be helpful. In the mean time, be safe, have fun & stay prepared! Photos by: Dick Roster Commando FC Brake Other interesting articles: How to Vanish: Part 1 Shemaghs, A Survival “Must Have” in 2020 Magpul M-LOK Rail Covers: Tactical Lego Fun and Function How to Choose an Urban Survival Bag

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